Allotment Basics

OK, so you've reached the top of the waiting list and if you are lucky you are now being offered a selection of plots.  The council has sent you a colourful pack with a list of rules, a map of each site you applied for, and a list of empty plots.  You now have to choose your plot and apply to the council in the time allocated (usually 3 weeks).   The question is... where do I start.…
Allotments are popular once more, and as a result finding one is becoming increasingly difficult with an esimated 100,000 on waiting lists accross the UK. If your determined to grow your own however, with a bit of legwork you should be able to get hold of somewhere to grow.
The origin of the modern allotment is an interesting one, and seems to have had two very different beginnings running in parallel before what we now know as an allotment was created. On the one hand the enclosure of common land led to a provision of growing land for the rural poor, and on the other the move into towns driven by the industrial revolution led to ‘city allotments’ that were predominantly gardened by the…
There is no doubt about it taking on an allotment is a lot of work and commitment, but the rewards are well worth it.  If you take one on then you need to make sure  that you can commit to the time required.  If your plot is not maintained up to a certain level then the council may well issue a notice to quit.   So if you're keen to take one on then what…
Allotments have become hugely popular in recent years with more an more people interested in growing their own fruit and veg, and as a result the image of the traditional allotment is changing.  Gone are the days of neat rows of potatoes, beans, and carrots.  Allotments are now more diverse than ever and many will have ponds, bee-hives, chickens, BBQ area, a patch of flowers for cutting and even fruit trees.

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