Jam Recipes

Blackberry jam can be made by anyone, and you don't need to grow these on the allotment to do so - just visit the local park. Pick the blackberries on a dry warm day when they are at their ripest, and make the jam as soon as possible after picking.
Once established blackcurrant bushes can produce several kilos of fruit. This jam is great for eating fresh, but also great for using in recipes. Pick the blackcurrants on a dry warm day when they are at their ripest, and make the jam as soon as possible after picking.
This is great made with British grown cherries when they are in season.  During the month of June you will often see sellers alongside the road offering the best cherries.
This jam can be made from late May right through until July, and is a wonderful way to preserve some of your gooseberry harvest.
Courgettes and marrows are some of the most prolific crops on any allotment.  Leave them for a few days and you will have so much you won’t know what to do with them. This recipe may sound unusual but produces some excellent results.
Not many allotment growers will go as far as growing peach trees on the plot, however watch out in August at fruit and vegetable markets, and you will see the price comes right down as they come into season.  It is therefore delicious and cheap to make.
Plums are rich in pectin and make a great jam.  You can use whatever plums, gages, bullaces or damsons you want and each will produce a subtly different jam. If you don't have space on your plot for a plum tree then have a look in the hedgerows!
This is one of the classic jam recipes, and well worth making. Pick the raspberries on a dry warm day when they are at their ripest, and make the jam as soon as possible after picking to capture the intense flavour.
Early or 'forced' rhubarb makes the best jam, and is one of the earliest you can make each year, with crops ready for harvesting between January and March.
The classic jam recipe. Make this jam when the strawberries are at their peak, and pick only the best fruit. If you use berries that are slightly past their best then they will blow to bits in the pan, use ones that are unripe or hard, and this will transpire in the final jam, and produce an unpleasant texture.

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